1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf

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Archive for the tag “Ian Herman”

Kanimambo – Tananas

Tananas

Tananas

On a first listen to this piece by one of our favourite instrumental groups, I guessed that Gito Baloi had a lot of influence in the writing of it. Why, you may well ask? Well, it seems to have a bit of a Latin sound going on there and being from Mozambique, Baloi would have had more of a Latin connection than his fellow band members. So I hauled out my copy of ‘SA Top 40 Hits Of All Time Volume 6’ to check out who wrote it and, well, it is credit to all three band member (Baloi plus Ian Herman and Steve Newman).

However, no matter how much input each band member had into the song, it  turned out to be an earthy piece with a cyclic relaxed rhythm circling around some fancy, yet understated guitar work while a female voice repeats the title and a somewhat thoaty male vocal adds some ‘way-i-i-o-i-i-o-ah’ into the mix for good measure. Then about two thirds of the way through, a 60s psychedelic organ wonders into the studio to give it a bit of a psychedelic feel.

This is a beautiful piece of music that seems to encapure the warmth and relaxed mood of both Africa and Latin America. It will make you want to go out and buy a hammock, string it up between two palm trees on a white sandy beach and gently sway to its rhythms while pretending to be able to play a guitar half as well as Steve Newman does.

Where to find it:
SA Top 40 Hits of All Time Volume 6 – Various Artists (2001), Sting Music, STIDFCD037

Shake – Tananas

Tananas

Tananas

I often wonder how musicians come up with names for instrumental pieces. I suppose it’s a bit like modern artists who put a few blobs of paint on a canvas and call it ‘Ash on a Moonscape’ or something equally bizarre. It is sometimes more about the feel of the painting that the artist wants to put over rather than what the actual visuals show. Similarly, the titles of instrumentals are about the feel that the musician has for the song.

That said, I am at a bit of loss as to why those Tananas dudes called this track ‘Shake’. To me it’s more thwacks and pops and bubbles and bangs and crashes than something that would make one shake in a ‘Shake Rattle And Roll’ sense. It is also earthy and funky and a little chilled to be make one shake in a ‘shaking in my shoes’ kind of way. Perhaps it is the sort of bubbling rolling sound that Steve Newman manges to extract from his guitar that makes it light and frothy in a milkshake kind of shake sense.

Whatever the reason behind naming the track ‘Shake’ it is a strutting piece of expert musicianship that blends bubbly beats with fruity flavours to give you a brilliant blend for slaking your thirst for cool sounds on. So get on down to the Tananas Roadhouse and order youself a delicious ‘Shake’.

Where to find it:
Tananas – Tananas (1988), Shifty, CDSHIFT(WL)26

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Hard Hat Jive – Tananas

Hard Hat Jive – Tananas (Construction time again)

Tananas

Tananas

Steve Newman is a national treasure. Between him and Tony Cox (whom he often collaborates with), they seem to have sewn up the ‘classical’ style of guitar playing. I use the word ‘classical’ for want of a better word as it is more in the style of playing than in sound. When Steve was not producing solo material, or jamming with his mate Tony, he would get hold of Ian Herman and the late Gito Baloi to record under the name of Tananas.

As Tananas, he could flesh out his plucking with some bass and drums, giving the music a bigger sound. Their eponymous debut album appeared on the legendary Shifty label and contained ‘Hard Hat Jive’, a bouncy piece that is as good as any to introduce the uninitiated into the world of Tananas. The song was included in the addendum to a recent book called ‘1001 Songs You Must Hear Before You Die’. The addendum which included ‘Hard Hat Jive’ listed the 10,001 songs you must download.

It starts off with a jazzy intro of drums, followed quickly by Gito’s bass and Steve’s guitar joins in moments later. The version on the album ‘Tananas’ shows the simple beauty of what the band did, but another version can be found on the album ‘Alive In Jo’burg’. This is more polished and features a pennywhistle solo as well, so which version to choose? It really depends on whether you like your Tananas raw, or well done.

Where to find it:
Tananas – Tananas (1988), Shifty, CDSHIFT(WL)26
Alive In Jo’burg (2001), Epic, CDEPC8171
Great South African Performers (2012), Gallo, CDPS 035

Video:

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