1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf

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Archive for the tag “Hak Hom Blokkies”

Going Away – David Kramer

David Kramer

David Kramer

‘Baboondogs’ is one of Kramer’s less popular albums but is one of his more critically acclaimed. Apart from containing his marvellous ‘Dry Wine’, there is also this little gem called ‘Going Away’ which ironically is more about staying than leaving.

Written at a time of huge upheaval in the country with the State of Emergency in place, the violence that beset the country and the very uncertain future for white South Africans, many people contemplated leaving the country in what was known then as ‘the chicken run’. There is no judgement from Kramer of those who chose to leave. He understands why people wanted to leave, but he knows what he will do, the words ‘As for me, I don’t think that I’ll be leaving/I belong here, I’ll be staying where I was born/These people are my people/These places are my places’ he sings, making it clear.

Most of ‘Baboondogs’ shows the serious side of Kramer. His hits were the ones that were carefree and about more trivial issues. Songs such as ‘Hak Hom Blokkies’, ‘Meissie Sonder Sokkies’ and ‘Die Royal Hotel’ while often having a line or two in the lyrics for those looking for deeper meaning, ‘Going Away’ and the rest of the ‘Baboondogs’ songs don’t have any of the frivolity that those hits had. ‘Going Away’ also features that rare thing, a saxophone on a David Kramer song. It is understandable why ‘Baboondogs’ was not as commercially successful as some of his other albums, but it is also completely understandable why it is one of his most critically acclaimed albums with tracks like this and ‘Dry Wine’ it finds the red veldtskoened one at his lyrical best.

Where to find it:
Vinyl – Baboondogs – David Kramer (1986), EMI, EMCJ(V)4051001

Video:

Hak Hom Blokkies – David Kramer

Die Verhaal Van Blokkies Joubert by David Kramer

Die Verhaal Van Blokkies Joubert by David Kramer

On 8 August 1981, there were 3 new entries on the Springbok Radio top
20
– Smokey Robinson’s ‘Being With You’; Michael Jackson’s ‘One Day In
Your Life’ and David Kramer’s ‘Hak Hom Blokkies’. Spot the odd one
out. Yes, you’re right it’s David Kramer, he’s the only one whose name
doesn’t end in ‘son’. (Seriously, it’s ‘Being With You’ as it was the
only one that didn’t go on to top the charts).

Kramer had made a bit of a name for himself with his debut album
Bakgat’, but most South Africans hadn’t heard of him until
‘Blokkies’ catapulted him into the spotlight. This little ditty that
sounded a lot like something you’d heard at a Boeredans, complete with
accordion and all, caused confusion. Those who had heard ‘Bakgat’ with
its serious undertones to quite often funny lyrics, were puzzled by
the apparent triteness of ‘Blokkies’, while those who loved the song
for its face value and sought out more of Kramer’s music would have
found that ‘Bakgat’ did not sit as comfortably on their turntables.

However, as a rugby loving nation, we were duty bound to embrace this
song, and embrace we did. ‘Hak Hom Blokkies’ spent 4 weeks at the top
of the Springbok Charts and was the only mixed English/Afrikaans song
to do so, some feat given that not too many years earlier, the SABC
had banned some of Jeremy Taylor’s mixed language songs for destroying
the purity of the languages.

Kramer went on to become a national treasure. Old Blokkies, he just
had that one game he played for the bokke back in 1931, but hey, we
all remember that game as if it were yesterday.

Where to find it:

David Kramer – Die Verhaal Van Blokkies Joubert (1981)

This album has never been released on CD and is available in digital format on Rhythm Music Store  exclusively by kind permission of David Kramer.

David Kramer – Klassic Kramer (1996), Blik Musiek, BLIK03

David Kramer – Jis Jis Jis (Live) (1983), Blik Musiek

Theuns Jordaan (cover version) – Ons Vir Jou Suid Afrika (2007), Jukebox Records

Lyrics:

The moustache on his lip is pencil thin
Like the middle path through his hair
And although his friends call him Blokkies
His wife would calls him joubert

Ag christina christina he thinks to himself, you never could understand
What it feels like to dummy and to sidestep
With a leather ball in your hands

Man it’s hard to believe this is Blokkies joubert
The hooker in the springbok scrum
Cause he’s old and grey and he sits in his chair
In the slanting winter sun
But he made his name with that wonderful game that he played
In 1931

Well he sits in the lounge of the old age home
Just a north of beaufort west
And he watches a t.v. program of the springbok rugby test
Aas the images flicker upon the screen he can hear the manne call
They say hak hom hak hom Blokkies, Blokkies hak daai ball
En ons sê:

Druk hulle, druk hulle bokkies, druk hulle mannetjies flou
Hak hulle hak Blokkies, hak hulle bolletjie gou
Lig julle kniee druk julle driee daar agter die doellyn nou

He sits there in the afternoon sun, his memories come and go
He can clearly recall Bennie Osler and Boy and Fanie Louw
Yes, there they stand with the rest of the team
In the photograph on the wall
And if you ask him he will show you where they signed on his rugby ball

Een ons sê:
Druk hulle, druk hulle bokkies, druk hulle mannetjies flou
Hak hulle hak Blokkies, hak hulle bolletjie gou
Lig julle kniee druk julle driee daar agter die doellyn nou

Ja ons ouens was rof in die ou dae but we played the gentleman’s game
But it’s all been spoiled by politics never going to be the same
So he drifts back to the old days as he hears the manne call
They say, hak hom, hak hom Blokkies, Blokkies hak daai ball

En ons sê:
Druk hulle, druk hulle bokkies, druk hulle mannetjies flou
Hak hulle hak Blokkies, hak hulle bolletjie gou
Lig julle kniee druk julle driee daar agter die doellyn nou

En ons sê:
Druk hulle, druk hulle bokkies, druk hulle mannetjies flou
Hak hulle hak Blokkies, hak hulle bolletjie gou
Lig julle kniee druk julle driee daar agter die doellyn nou

Written by David Kramer, published by Blik Musiek

Website:

DavidKramer.co.za

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