1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf

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Archive for the tag “Glenys Lynne”

Jimmy Come Lately – Four Jacks & A Jill

Jimmy Come Lately – Four Jacks & A Jill

Jimmy Come Lately – Four Jacks & A Jill

Four Jacks & A Jill have been one of the longest surviving groups to come out of the South African music scene. They formed in 1964 and still occasionally perform. A couple of years after getting together, they saw their first Springbok Top 20 success with ‘Jimmy Come Lately’, a cover of ‘Ginny Come Lately’ which was a US number 21 hit in 1962 for Brian Hyland.

Ginny had a sex change, presumably because Glenys Lynne, the lead singer for Four Jacks & A Jill, was a female, while Brian Hyland was singing about his girl. So Ginny became Jimmy. And Four Jacks & A Jill speed up the song slightly as Hyland’s version is like a slow stroll along the promenade, while Four Jacks and A Jill skip through a field with Jimmy. This song set the tone for all their hits that were to follow. There is the purity of Glenys Lynne’s voice, the 60’s pop sensibilities in the instrumentation and an overall feeling of all things good. It is honey in the shape of a 7” single. Even the short organ interlude in the song keeps things sweet without being sickly so. It also does not venture into the more psychedelic direction that Hammond organs were taken in around that time.

The song would get to number 2 and spend 12 weeks on the Springbok charts, which was an excellent start for a band which would go on to be the top performing local artist on the charts in the 60’s (they ended up being the top performing group by the time the charts ended, but were beaten by Barbara Ray, Alan Garrity and Billy Forrest). It is a little ironic that ‘Jimmy Come Lately’ came early in their career as usually things that come late miss out. But for Four Jacks & A Jill, they did not miss out and in the words of another woman with a voice of honey, Karen Carpenter, they could well have sung, We’ve Only Just Begun’.

Where to find it:
The Heart And Soul Of – Four Jacks & A Jill (2001), Gallo, CDREDD 661

Video:

The Wonder Of Your Love – Jody Wayne

The Wonder Of Your Love – Jody Wayne

The Wonder Of Your Love – Jody Wayne

Jody Wayne topped the Sprinbok Top 20 with ‘The Wedding’ in 1970. After that his fortunes took a turn for the worse in terms of chart success as his next 3 hits, ‘A Time For Us’, ‘Everything Is Beautiful’ and ‘Louanne’ peaked at 12, 20 and 19 respectively. However, with ‘The Wonder Of You’ he once more climbed into the top 5 on our charts as the song peaked at number 4. It was his 8th song to make the charts and at that point he was tied second with Four Jacks & A Jill for number of hits on the chart by a local act, only being beaten by Billy Forrest’s 9.

Listening to ‘The Wonder Of You’ one can see why he regained the lost ground. It is a fine example of a 70’s country-pop ballad. It’s emotional, has a strong country guitar, a laid back rhythm and Jody’s sweet vocals which are interchanged with emotionally charged spoken bits. The slow beat of the song was perfect for any slow dance in its day and I’m sure many a couple have fond memories of this hit.

Yes, like a number of songs on this list, ‘The Wonder Of Love’ was of its time and does sound a little dated now, but it was a big hit in its time. It would be Wayne’s last top 5 hit, although ‘A Picture Of Patches’ and his duet with Four Jacks & A Jill’s Glenys Lynne, ‘Cookie’, would manage to get to 6 and 7 respectively. Jody was one of the top local acts of the 70’s scoring 7 hits during that decade. So, listen to one of his bigger hits of that time and enjoy the wonder of Jody.

Where to find it:
Various Artists – The Best of SA Pop Volume 3 (1994) GSP, CDREDD 610

Video:

Ramaja – Glenys Lynne

Ramaja – Glenys Lynne (A yes to margarine – Rama, ja.)

Glenys Lynne - Ramaja

Glenys Lynne – Ramaja (image courtesy of Suid-Afrikaanse Musiek Blog)

Glenys was possibly better known as Jill as she was the female in Four Jacks and A Jill, but she did have some solo success. In fact Ramaja became the only totally Afrikaans song to top the Springbok Top 20 (David Kramer’s ‘Hak Hom Blokkies’ did have an Afrikaans chorus, but the refrains were in English) and that is what makes it important to listen to.

The song is bright, breezy and bouncy and probably had many a sokkie jol bopping in no time. It could well have featured in the Eurovision song competition if South Africa had been part of Europe as it has that candy floss flavour and the requisite strange words like ‘Hikka Tikka Prrr’ that are essential in any song entering that competition.

Strangely, the lyrics didn’t seem to cause a furore in apartheid South Africa with a good clean cut white girl seeking the help of a witch doctor to protect her man and bring him back to her. Perhaps the request to protect and bring back her love hinted at the plight of women whose men had headed off to the border and that sentiment saved the song from criticism.

No matter the reason for it not being criticised, it had some impact as in more recent times girl group Shine 4 have covered it.

Where to find it:
Various Artists – The Best of SA Pop Volume 1 (1994) GMP, CDGMPD 40485 (CD)

Video:

Glenys Lynne:

Shine 4:

Lyrics:

Hikka Tikka Prrr Ha Ha Ha
Hikka Tikka Prrr Ramaja

Ramaja!
Sy naam was Ramaja.
Hy kom uit Afrika.
Ek wil hom gunste vra.
Wo-wo-wo

Ramaja!
Toordokter Ramaja, sal jy vir my kan sê: “Waar liefde lê”?
Hikki Prrr Mapah, as jy dolosse gooi.
La-la-la-la-la
Hikki Prrr Mapah, om die vure rooi.
La-la-la-la-la

Rondom drom want die donker wil.
La-la-la-la-la
Hikki Prrr Mapah, is die liefde koud?
La-la-la-la-la
Vra die eerste honderd bewaar.
Hou hom weg van alle gevaar.
Ek sien hom, hy’s my behoud.
Bring hom terug na my.

Ramaja.
Toordokter Ramaja, sal jy vir my kan sê: “Hoe ver die liefde lê”?
Wo-wo-wo

Rajama!
Jou naam is Ramaja.
Jy kom uit Afrika.
Ek wil jou vra.

Hikki Prrr Mapah, bring die moetie gou.
La-la-la-la-la
Hikki Prrr Mapah, waar die dop laat brou.
La-la-la-la-la
Gee my ‘n twee punte towerwoord.
La-la-la-la-la
Hikki Prrr Mapah, met ‘n liefdes skoot.
La-la-la-la-la
Vra die eerste honderd bewaar.
Hou hom weg van alle gevaar.
Ek sien hom, hy’s my behoud.
Bring hom terug na my.

Hikka Tikka Prrr Ha Ha Ha
Hikka Tikka Prrr
Hikka Tikka Prrr Ha Ha Ha
Hikka Tikka Prrr Ramaja
Hikka Tikka Prrr Ha Ha Ha
Hikka Tikka Prrr Ramaja

Ramaja!
Vra die eerste honderd bewaar.
Hou hom weg van alle gevaar.
Ek voel te koud, hy’s my behoud.
Bring hom terug na my.

Ramaja!
Toordokter Ramaja, sal jy vir my kan sê: “Hoe ver die liefde lê”?
Wo-wo-wo-wo

Rajama!
Jou naam is Ramaja.
Jy kom uit Afrika.
Ek wil jou vra.
La-la-la-la-la
La-la-la-la-la
La-la-la-la-la
La-la-la-la-la

(Music and lyrics: deur Simone/Regal/Van Rensburg)

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