1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf

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Archive for the category “Billy Forrest”

Time And The River – Dream Merchants

Time And The River - Dream Merchants

Time And The River – Dream Merchants

People often refer to Father Time and depict him as a white haired, bearded individual. There is also a song called ‘Old Man River’ so the subject of The Dream Merchants’ ‘Time And The River’ seems to refer to elderly men. However, the Billys (Forrest and Andrews) who sang this version of the song were not that old when they sang it, being in their late 20s in 1967 when it was released. Nat King Cole who also sang a version of it in 1960 was a bit older being around 41, but still not an old man. Despite this age difference in singers and age gaps, the song is well worth a listen, no matter what your age.

Cole’s version is as silky smooth as one would expect from a crooner like him, it is a lazy river slowly meandering its way down to the sea. The Dream Merchants on the other hand are a little faster flowing, upping the tempo and building in a big sound with guitars a-strumming, a pounding piano and a soaring vocal that would probably lift the eyebrows of a few reality talent show judges these days, especially as Billy (not sure which one) builds up to the crescendo finale of the song and moves his vocals up a few notches.

This is one of those songs that is so full of good things (energy, passion, vooma and any other word that describes a similar thing) that it is difficult not to be moved when listening to it. It’s too suave a song to be classified as white water rafting, but it certainly flows smoothly over the eardrums.

Where to find it:
The Heart And Soul Of – Billy Forrest Gallo CDREDD 654, 2001

Video:

I Loved ‘Em Everyone – Billy Forrest

I Loved ‘Em Everyone - Billy Forrest

I Loved ‘Em Everyone – Billy Forrest

There is a very definite connection between the song ‘I Loved ‘Em Everyone’, singing under a pseudomyn, your original first name being William and your surname starting with a ‘B’. In 1981 William Neal Browder (better known as T.G. Sheppard) recorded the song which was penned by Phil Sampson and it became his 7th number 1 on the Country Singles Charts in the US. In 1983 William Broad (aka Billy Forrest) took his version to number 17 in South Africa.

The song covers the same ground as the Willie Nelson/Julio Iglesias song ‘To All The Girls I’ve Loved Before’ as it is a tribute to all the women the singers have loved and how they “Loved Them Everyone” and how he would loved to have “kept ‘em all”. It paints a picture of a wanderer who strikes up relationships and then moves on. There is a mixed emotion in the song as it seems that the singer enjoyed having met all these woman, but at the same time there is an undercurrent of regret at not being able to settle down with one.

Its not a full on country song with twangy guitars and voices, but would probably better be described as country rock as there are some heavier touches on the guitar which give it a harder edge, but it still has that sort of wide open prairie sound to keep it country.

There is not a huge amount to choose from between Billy and T.G.’s versions. They are pretty similar, but as South Africans, we got to know the song through Billy Forrest. He was a prolific singer, coming up with songs under a variety of names, but we ‘Loved ‘Em Every One.’

Where to find it:
The Heart And Soul Of – Billy Forrest (2001), Gallo, CDREDD 654

Video:
Billy Forrest:

T.G. Sheppard:

Lazy Life – Quentin E Klopjaeger

Lazy Life – Quentin E Klopjaeger

Lazy Life - Quentin E Klopjaeger

Lazy Life – Quentin E Klopjaeger

This song is made from warm Saturday afternoons, the smell of newly cut grass, the sound of bees buzzing, blues skies, the aroma of boerewors braaing on the fire and kids running free in a large park. The rhythm section is a pulsing blue sky and the vocals are a cool breeze blowing through the scene.

Written by Gordon Haskell and with The Gonks playing the instruments, Quentin E Klopjaeger (aka Billy Forrest) put together a song of pure pop magic. At just over 2 minutes long, the song is bright and breezy and captures all the joy of a lazy life, you know, those days where you just get away from everything. A modern day title for the song would be called ‘Spending Quality Time With Your Family’, but that doesn’t scan as well.

The song topped the SA charts in June 1968 and spent 2 weeks there. The timing of this is quite odd as it would have been the middle of winter. Perhaps the country was just longing for those warmer lazy days to come again, but it just goes to show that, although ‘Lazy Life’ may seem to be a summer song, it is in fact one for all seasons.

Where to find it:
Various Artists – The Best of SA Pop Volume 1 (1994) GMP, CDGMPD 40485 (CD)

Video:

Abergavenny – Quentin E Klopjaeger

Abergavenny – Quentin E Klopjaeger (Having a Wales of a time)

Abergavenny

Abergavenny

Abergavenny is a town in Wales, sometimes referred to as the Gateway to Wales. Judging by the pictures on the internet, it is a rather charming town set amongst rolling green hills and features a ruined cathedral and the River Usk. However, this is a review of the song and not the town.

That said, knowing a bit about the town helps you understand why Quentin E Klopjaeger was so cheerful about going there (that and the fact that no one would know him as really being the famous Billy Forrest using one of his many aliases). There is a carnival atmosphere about the song with flutes and drums and brass bands.

Released in 1969, this is a cover version of the Marty Wilde hit (to those of you who grew up in the 80’s Marty was Kim Wilde’s dad) and follows that version quite closely. However in those days that was the main form cover versions took and we can proudly lay claim to a version as good as the original.

Where to find it:
Fantasy – Quentin E Klopjaeger (Polydor 277019), 1969
The Heart And Soul Of – Billy Forrest (Gallo CDREDD 654), 2001

Lyrics:

Taking a trip up to Abergavenny
Hoping the weather is fine
If you should see a red dog running free
Well, you know he’s mine

A chase in the hills up to Abergavenny
I’ve got to get there and fast
If you can’t go
Then I promise to show you a photograph

Ah, passing the time with paradise people
Paradise people are fine by me
Sunshine forever, lovely weather
Don’t you wish you could be…..

Taking a trip up to Abergavenny
Hoping the weather is fine
If you should see a red dog running free
Well, you know he’s mine

Ah, passing the time with paradise people
Paradise people are fine by me
Sunshine forever, lovely weather
Don’t you wish you could be…..

A chase in the hills up to Abergavenny
I’ve got to get there and fast
If you can’t go
Then I promise to show you a photograph
A little photograph, a little photograph
Up to Abergavenny

La-la-la-la……

(Written by Jack Geller & Frere Manston)

Website:

http://www.rock.co.za/files/klopjaeger_index.htm

Video:

Quentin E. Klopjaeger version:

Marty Wilde Version:

Links:

Abergavenny tourism:

http://www.abergavenny.net/

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